2015 Summer Game Project – Fast Paced Rogue-Like

In an attempt to gain familiarity with different approaches and methods towards game design and implementing images/text files into projects, I created several short games over the summer that were fast, fun, and a learning experience.

After spending a while playing games like FTL, the Binding of Isaac, and even watching twitch.tv streams like FourBitFriday’s Catacomb Kids really interested me in the realm of rogue like games. This time, I wanted to make a game that was as organized as I could make it while also advancing my skills in animation and level generation.

In my previous games, animating had been a real challenge because I had never implemented something solely for the purpose of animation. With this game, however, I decided to simplify it so that it wouldn’t be such a pain to implement every time I wanted a new entity. This determination propelled me to learn as much as I could about the animation process and sprite sheets as a whole, and in the end I found a pretty simple way of handling animation.

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Final product

I also spent a long time figuring out how to add smooth camera controls. After playing the game with a rigid camera, i knew it was time to make it smoother in order to encourage a faster pace throughout the game. So I learned a lot about how cameras and perspectives can interact with the current view point, knowledge that would become invaluable to me in future projects.

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Close-up of an enemy mob in the game

Lastly, I learned a lot about level creation. I had never made something that could load levels before, but I wanted to try and make a system for that specifically for this game. I decided to use a simple program like MSPaint to draw out the levels using colors to represent the various blocks, load them in, and connect them room by room. This proved more of a challenge than I had originally thought, as I did not anticipate the difficulty that came with reading RGB values of individual pixels. However, I pushed through by learning not only how to look at each individual pixel, but also the notation for RGB as well.

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An example of what a level looks like in MSPaint. Gray/Black = walls, Blue = enemy spawn points, etc.

This project was a fun one. I feel it really enhanced my organization skills when it comes to code as a whole, as well as strengthened my knowledge on how each individual part of a project comes together in the end to make one single product.

You can find the source code here (Java, 742kb): https://drive.google.com/file/d/0Bz_0wgRmDpKqTXNCSjFEU0V3X2M/view?usp=sharing

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2015 Summer Game Project – Creation Sandbox

In an attempt to gain familiarity with different approaches and methods towards game design and implementing images/text files into projects, I created several short games over the summer that were fast, fun, and a learning experience.

This game is a side scrolling-open world-randomly generated creation sandbox similar to games like Minecraft or Terraria. In fact, the inspiration from this game came from spending several weeks replaying Terraria. Anyway, I wanted to explore concepts like world generation, mob behavior, inventory systems, animation, and more.

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Final product.

After creating a basic world, I decided to first take on mob interaction. Having not done anything like this before, I found it challenging at first to figure out how to not only spawn mobs in strategic places around the player, but how they could be unique from each other and their interaction with the player. I added 2 mobs: a snake, and a slime. They differ in behavior in that the snakes are faster while the slimes jump higher.

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Some slimes jumping above the player.

Another one of the most challenging yet most interesting parts of making this game was the world generation. I spent about 3 days wondering how I would add interesting caves, or even things like ore into the game. My final solution was to add something of a ‘miner’, a randomly placed dirt destroyer that cleared out the underground area it started in and moved around randomly until it decided to stop.

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Example of a very small fraction of the world, but in tile IDs. -1 = empty space underground, 0 = sky, 1 = dirt, 2 = grass, 4 = tree, etc.

All in all I learned a lot about this project, whether intentional or unintentional. One of the more important lessons it taught me is that organization, especially between objects, is crucial for keeping the entire project as a whole neat and orderly.

You can find the source code here (Java, 311kb): https://drive.google.com/file/d/0Bz_0wgRmDpKqZFpfMHlEUlNvdU0/view?usp=sharing